Category: Immigration

Resume Tips

Learn How to Write a Canadian Style Resume

You might be wondering why, after sending so many resumes, you have not received a ton of responses yet. As a new immigrant to Canada there are a number of potential differences between the way you are used to writing a resume and the Canadian expectations. Learn these Canadian resume tips to strengthen your job search and improve upon your most important marketing tool in the interview process.

  1. Keep it short and concise. In Canada, most people have a resume that is a maximum of two pages long. Keep it to one page if are a recent graduate or do not have a lot of experience.
  2. Include your contact information for the potential employer to reach you. Provide information such as a phone number, email address and mailing address. Don’t attach a photo or any personal information including gender, marital status, or religion.
  3. Change your resume for each job you apply for. It is important to only include skills and experience relevant to the position such as the proper name of previous companies, where the business was located, and the title of the job that you had and a brief description of the position. Also, include any volunteer work you have done. Do not include personal interest and hobbies unless they are relevant to the position
  4. Ensure your resume format style is consistent. You should avoid long paragraphs and small fonts, 12 point font is standard. Use an easily readable font and make sure that only one font is used throughout. Ensure your resume format style is consistent.
  5. Have an up-to-date online resume. LinkedIn is a professional online platform that is frequently used in Canada for networking and the job search process. Many employers’ look-up job applicants on LinkedIn as well as other social media sites like Facebook and Twitter so make sure they are up-to-date and match the professional image you would like to portray.
  6. Finally, it is always a good idea to have your resume proofread by another person who is fluent in the language for typos, proper grammar, and completeness.

Once you apply these tips, you can start to focus on the interview preparation process. Happy job hunting!

Stay in Canada After Graduation

Stay in Canada After You Graduate

Are you an international student who is about to complete your post-secondary education in Canada? Do you wish to stay in Canada after you graduate and obtain Canadian work experience? Then the Post-Graduation Work Permit program (PGWPP) may be what you’re looking for.

To work in Canada after you graduate, you need a work permit. The PGWPP allows students who have graduated from eligible Canadian designated learning institutions to obtain an open work permit and gain valuable Canadian work experience. An advantage of this program is that the work experience you gain may help you qualify for permanent residence.

How Long Will My Permit Be?

The duration of your post-graduation work permit (PGWP) will depend on the length of your study program. If your educational program was between eight months to two years, your PGWP may be valid for up to the same length as your study program. Alternatively, if the education program you completed was two or more years, then your PGWP may be issued for 3 years. If you complete more than one eligible program, you may be able to get a PGWP that combines the length of each program.

Programs that run for less then eight months are not eligible for the PGWPP. You also can’t get a PGWP if you already had one after completing an earlier program of study.

Am I Eligible?

On February 14, 2019, the Government of Canada extended the time to apply from 90 to 180 days, six months, after your designated learning institution issues your final marks confirming that the requirements to complete the program of study have been met.

You must also have maintained full-time status as a student in Canada during each semester of your study program (except your final semester, which can be part-time, or if you took a leave from studies) to be eligible.

Special cases:

If you’re in any of these groups, there are unique requirements to be aware of that may influence your eligibility.

  • Accelerated programs
  • Distance learning
  • Leave from studies
  • Transfers between schools
  • Canadian study programs with an overseas component
  • Flight school graduates

What Happens if I Don’t Qualify?

If you’re not eligible for a PGWP, you may still be able to work in Canada after you graduate. Contact us to have one of our Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants help you determine the best program for your situation.

Interim Caregiver

Interim Pathway for Caregivers – The Basics

The Interim Pathway for Caregivers is a dedicated pathway to permanent residence for qualifying in-home caregivers in effect March 4, 2019 until June 4, 2019. If you have work experience in Canada as a home child care provider or home support worker, you may be able to apply for permanent residence.

To be eligible to apply, you must have the required:

  • status in Canada
  • work experience
  • language levels (CLB 5 in English or NLCL 5 in French)
  • education (equal to a Canadian secondary school, also known as high school, diploma)

You must also plan to live outside the province of Quebec.

At the Time You Apply

To meet the status requirements when you apply, you must either have a valid work permit; have applied to extend your work permit and be waiting on a decision; or have applied to restore your status as a worker.

For your work experience in Canada to be eligible, you need to have worked as a home child care provider, a home support worker, or a combination of the two. You will also need to have gained this experience while working in the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

You will also need to have at least 12 months of full-time work experience (at least 30 hours of paid work per week) since November 30, 2014. Breaks in employment (for example, periods where you weren’t working, on sick leave or parental leave) are allowed, however, any work experience you had while you were a full-time student doesn’t count.

It is important to note you’ll have to include documents to show proof of your work experience in your application.

If you’re interested in applying and believe you meet the above criteria, contact us. We would love to assist you with the application process.

What You Should Know About Biometrics

Biometrics - digital fingerprintThe second phase of Canada’s biometrics collection program came into force as of December 31, 2018. With this second phase, nationals from countries in Asia, Asia Pacific and the Americas must give their fingerprints and submit photos (biometrics) when applying for a Canadian visitor visa, study or work permit, or for permanent residence. This rule came into effect for applicants from countries in Europe, the Middle East and Africa on July 31, 2018, and for temporary resident applicants from 29 countries and 1 territory in 2013.

To make this process as convenient as possible for applicants, the Government of Canada has expanded its worldwide network of visa application centres (VAC) and is allowing applicants to go to any VAC in any country they are legally allowed to enter.

Applicants who come to Canada to visit, study or work temporarily need to give their biometrics only once every 10 years. Permanent resident applicants need to give their biometrics each time they apply.

Why Biometrics?

Biometrics immigration screening helps protects the safety and security of Canadians, and the integrity of the immigration system, while simplifying entry for travellers with genuine identities.

Do You Need to Provide Biometrics?

Generally, you need to give biometrics if you apply for:

  • a visitor visa
  • a work or study permit (excluding U.S. nationals)
  • permanent residence
  • refugee or asylum status

However, there are some exemptions.

Exemptions:

  • Canadian citizens, citizenship applicants (including passport applicants), or existing permanent residents
  • visa-exempt nationals coming to Canada to visit only
  • children under the age of 14
  • applicants over the age of 79 (there is no upper age exemption for asylum claimants)
  • heads of state and heads of government
  • applicants who qualify for or hold a diplomatic or official visa
  • S. visa holders transiting through Canada
  • refugee claimants or protected persons who have already provided biometrics and are applying for a study or work permit
  • temporary resident applicants who have already provided biometrics in support of a permanent resident application that is still in progress

Temporary exemption: Applying in Canada

  • If you are applying for a visa, study or work permit, or permanent residence in Canada – you are exempt until the in-Canada service is established.

Contact our team of experienced RCICs for assistance with determining if you need to submit biometrics.

Top Five Reasons to Live in New Brunswick

Choosing where to live is a big decision that can be a bit nerve-racking. To help make your decision easier, here is a list of five reasons you may want to choose New Brunswick as your new home.

Eastquoddy Lighthouse (Campobello, New Brunswick Canada)

Work Life Balance

New Brunswick is a land for people who desire a simpler, no-frills lifestyle amidst a land teeming with lakes and forests. It has a reputation for a strong work ethic, employer loyalty and a healthy work/life balance. While hard work is valued, people take the time to enjoy family and leisure activities as well.

Inexpensive Real Estate

Compared to other provinces, New Brunswick offers some of the least expensive real estate in the country. The average price of homes sold in New Brunswick was $189,118 in June 2018, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association. These low prices allow most families to afford a home and land, where in other areas this is something enjoyed only by the wealthy.

Hopewell Rocks in Canada at sunrise

The Breathtaking Landscapes

There is no denying the beauty of Atlantic Canada with stunning fjords, sweeping tides and defiant lighthouses staring down the ocean from the rocky shore. There are a number of culturally and historically significant landmarks to enjoy too.

Top Tier Education

New Brunswick offers your children access to some of the finest education in the country, with all citizens and permanent residents enjoying government-funded education until the age of 20. The province also boasts the highest high school graduation rate in the country.

Bilingual Province

New Brunswick is the only Canadian province that has both French and English as its official language, by law. Research has now shown that bilingual young adults not only fare better in the job market, but are also more likely to demonstrate empathy and problem-solving skills. Imagine the possibilities that might come with being fluent in three languages.

If a low-key, relaxing, outdoor lifestyle is of interest to you, then you should consider New Brunswick. Contact our team today at info@activeprofessionals.com to learn more about the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program and determine your next steps.

Top Considerations When Looking for Your First Home

You’re in the process of making Canada your new home and now it is time to look for a place of your own. Before you begin shopping for a house, it’s important to know how much you can afford. At this stage, you should also consider whether you would like to rent or buy.

Once you know what you can spend, you will want to determine what you are looking for in a home now as well as what you might want in the future. Some considerations include:

  • Size Requirements, Housing Type and Special Features: How many bedrooms/bathrooms would you like? Would you like to have a yard or a Garage? Do you want air conditioning, storage, or a fireplace? Do you have family members with special needs?
  • Setting, Lifestyles and Stages: Do you want to live in a city, the suburbs or a rural environment? Do you plan to have children? Do you have teenagers who will be moving away soon? Are you close to retirement?
  • Work and Schools: Are you willing to take on a long commute every morning? Which schools are in your neighbourhood? How will your children get there?
  • Culture, Family and friends: How important is it to live close to them? Do you have a place of worship or cultural community centre nearby?

After determining your expectations and financial capabilities, it is time to consider which neighbourhood is right for you and what is available on the market. Your home’s location will play a big role in your everyday life, so it’s important to consider all of the features that come with a new neighborhood before deciding where to buy. Here is a list of some factors that may influence your decision.

  • Neighborhood safety, emergency services, hospitals and medical care
  • Preschools, elementary schools, and high schools
  • Banking and financial institutions
  • Grocery stores, parks and shopping

Finally, you may want to find yourself a real estate agent who knows the market and can help you locate your dream home.

Immigration Consultant (RCIC)

Why hire an immigration consultant to help you with your study permit application

In order to obtain approval on a study permit application, you as the applicant must convince the immigration officer that:

  • You have been accepted to study at a designated learning institution,
  • You have sufficient funds to cover the cost of your study plus your living expenses (without working),
  • You have enough ties to your country of origin in order to show you will leave Canada at the end of your stay.

Many students believe it is enough to have been accepted into a post-secondary institution, but unfortunately, it is not the case.

The main reasons for refusal of a study permit application are lack of evidence of sufficient funds, and lack of evidence of ties to country of origin such as prospective employment, establishment in your home country, and purpose of the visit to Canada.

Even though it is not mandatory to hire an immigration consultant to assist you with your application for a study permit, nor it guarantees approval,  it is useful to have an immigration consultant evaluate your case and help foresee possible weaknesses in your application. Active Professionals can guide you on what documents to obtain and how to show all the necessary evidence in order to avoid refusal.

If you have already applied and were refused, let us help you. We will look at the reasons why your application was denied and will guide you on gathering the documentation needed to rectify the issue.