A Brief History of Canada

A Brief History of Canada

Canada is relatively a new country compared to the long-established nations of the world in Africa, Asia and Europe. Although, Canadian history does have a rich pageantry in the short time since it has become an independent nation.

Origin

Canada’s name originates from the Huron/Iroquois name ‘Kanata’, which means ‘settlement’, or ‘village’.  The first inhabitants on the land were indigenous people.  The Vikings, Norsemen, also established a settlement in Newfoundland around 1001 AD, and explorer Leif Erikson and his crew were the first Europeans to touch the earth in North America, 500 years before Christopher Columbus arrived.

Exploration

The country was first explored mainly by French explorers such as Jacques Cartier, who in 1534 mapped the Gulf of St. Lawrence and claimed the land as the Colony of New France. Then Samuel de Champlain established the city of Quebec in 1608 and was named the ‘Father of New France’. Rich in natural resources and a booming fur trade, other nations, such as Great Britain, also wanted to claim Canada as its own.

Govern & Ruling

Prior to the birth of the nation, part of the land was under French rule. During the next 200 years, conflict ensued and in 1763 it was ceded to England after the French were defeated on the Plains of Abraham just outside of Quebec City, in the Seven Years War.  Canada became a colony of England until 1867, when the new independent nation, the Dominion of Canada was established. Today, Canada is still a member of the British Commonwealth.

Under the guidance of Canada’s first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, the Province of Canada (which consisted of Lower and Upper Canada, now the provinces of Ontario and Quebec), was joined by two other British colonies, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, to form a confederation of provinces and a self-governing entity. On July 1, 1867, the Dominion of Canada was born.

There are now 10 provinces and three territories that comprise Canada, and each province and territory has its own capital.  In 1870 the province of Manitoba and the Northwest Territories joined confederation.  Using the promise of completing a railroad across Canada by the Canadian Government, British Columbia joined the Confederation in 1871.   Prince Edward Island, Canada’s smallest province, was added to the nation in 1873.  25 years later, in 1898, the Yukon Territories became part of Canada, partially due to the Yukon Gold Rush that needed policing at the time.  Alberta and Saskatchewan joined in 1905, and the last province to become part of Canada was Newfoundland and Labrador, in 1949.  Nunavut, which was part of the Northwest Territories, entered Confederation in 1999.

There have been 22 Canadian Prime Ministers, from the first one, Sir John A. Macdonald to our current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.  William Lyon Mackenzie King has been the longest serving Prime Minister as he was the head of government for more than 21 years.  John A. MacDonald, Wilfred Laurier and Pierre Trudeau all served as Prime Minister for more than 15 years each.

War and Conflict

Since becoming a nation Canada has been involved in 14 different wars and conflicts throughout the world, starting with the Fenian Raids in 1866-1871. As a colony of Great Britain, Canadians fought in the War of 1812 with the British against the United States and it was during the war, due to the American threat, that the city of Ottawa was made the capital of Canada. 

Canada had a defining moment on the international stage in World War 1 in 1917, when four divisions in the Canadian Corps attacked Vimy Ridge during the Battle of Arras in France and overtook the Germans in four days.  It was a huge victory but had a terrible cost as over 10,000 Canadians either lost their lives or were wounded in the battle.  It was the first time in history that Canada attacked another nation as one military unit.

Canada also served and played a big role in the Second World War, declaring war on Germany a week after the British declared war on the axis nations.  The nation participated in the Korean War and present day it is battling ISIS, along with numerous other countries.

Despite being involved in numerous wars and conflicts, Canada is viewed as a peacekeeping nation, partially due to the work of Canadian diplomat and former Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson.  In 1957 Pearson won the Nobel Peace Prize for his involvement in solving the Suez Crisis, convincing Britain and France to depart from Egypt.  He created the United Nations Emergency Force, which is the modern concept used at present for peacekeeping.

Want to learn more about Canada?

14 Canadian Facts You Should know

There is so much to learn about a new country when you first arrive. Here are 14 facts about Canada that you should know as you take off on your Canadian journey.

Canadian Facts

Canadian Facts

  1. Canada is the second largest land mass country in the world after Russia.
  2. Canada borders three oceans; Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific.
  3. Canada has the longest shared border in the world with the United States, 8893 kms.
  4. Boasting the longest coastline in the world, Canada has 243,977 kms of shoreline.
  5. There are approximately 36 million people living in Canada.
  6. O’ Canada is the national anthem.
  7. There are two official languages in Canada, English and French.
  8. Mount Logan is Canada’s highest mountain and resides in the Yukon.
  9. Canada’s longest river is the Mackenzie River.
  10. The official animal of Canada is the North American Beaver.
  11. Canada’s official motto is: ‘From Sea to Sea’.
  12. Canada’s official sports are hockey and lacrosse.
  13. Nunavut is translated to ‘our land’.
  14. Montreal is the second largest French speaking city in the world after Paris.

10 Canadian Inventors to Recognize

Did you know Canadian inventors have patented more than one million inventions? Canadian’s have contributed everything from AC radio tubes to zippers. Here are just 10 of those inventors and what they have contributed.

Canadian Inventor - Joseph Armand Bombardier
Joseph Armand Bombardier

Batteries

Canadian Inventor - Sanford Fleming
Sanford Fleming

Canadian Inventor - James Naismith
James Naismith

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Canadian Inventors

  1. Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone, among other devices, in 1876
  2. James Naismith created the game of basketball in 1891
  3. Joseph Armand Bombardier invented the snowmobile in 1922
  4. Gideon Sundback created the zipper in 1917
  5. Sanford Fleming developed a global system for setting time, including time zones
  6. Lewis Urry invented both the alkaline and lithium batteries while working for Eveready
  7. George Klein invented the electric wheel chair for the veterans from the Second World War
  8. Donald Lewis Hings invented the Walkie Talkie, a portable radio signaling system in 1937
  9. Peter Robertson invented the Robertson screw driver and the square head screw in 1908
  10. Susan Olivia Poole created the Jolly Jumper for babies

What You Should Know About Biometrics

Biometrics - digital fingerprintThe second phase of Canada’s biometrics collection program came into force as of December 31, 2018. With this second phase, nationals from countries in Asia, Asia Pacific and the Americas must give their fingerprints and submit photos (biometrics) when applying for a Canadian visitor visa, study or work permit, or for permanent residence. This rule came into effect for applicants from countries in Europe, the Middle East and Africa on July 31, 2018, and for temporary resident applicants from 29 countries and 1 territory in 2013.

To make this process as convenient as possible for applicants, the Government of Canada has expanded its worldwide network of visa application centres (VAC) and is allowing applicants to go to any VAC in any country they are legally allowed to enter.

Applicants who come to Canada to visit, study or work temporarily need to give their biometrics only once every 10 years. Permanent resident applicants need to give their biometrics each time they apply.

Why Biometrics?

Biometrics immigration screening helps protects the safety and security of Canadians, and the integrity of the immigration system, while simplifying entry for travellers with genuine identities.

Do You Need to Provide Biometrics?

Generally, you need to give biometrics if you apply for:

  • a visitor visa
  • a work or study permit (excluding U.S. nationals)
  • permanent residence
  • refugee or asylum status

However, there are some exemptions.

Exemptions:

  • Canadian citizens, citizenship applicants (including passport applicants), or existing permanent residents
  • visa-exempt nationals coming to Canada to visit only
  • children under the age of 14
  • applicants over the age of 79 (there is no upper age exemption for asylum claimants)
  • heads of state and heads of government
  • applicants who qualify for or hold a diplomatic or official visa
  • S. visa holders transiting through Canada
  • refugee claimants or protected persons who have already provided biometrics and are applying for a study or work permit
  • temporary resident applicants who have already provided biometrics in support of a permanent resident application that is still in progress

Temporary exemption: Applying in Canada

  • If you are applying for a visa, study or work permit, or permanent residence in Canada – you are exempt until the in-Canada service is established.

Contact our team of experienced RCICs for assistance with determining if you need to submit biometrics.

Canadian Fun Facts (You May Not Want to Know)

Do you think you’re an expert on Canada? Want to become one? Here are some Canadian fun facts you probably didn’t know, and maybe will wish you didn’t afterwards.
Canada Fun Facts

  1. Canadians consume more macaroni and cheese, a dish of English origin consisting of cooked macaroni pasta and a cheese sauce, per capita than anywhere else in the world
  2. One of the most popular foods is poutine, made with cheese curds and gravy on French fries, which originated in Quebec in the late 1950s
  3. John Panopoulos, a Greek-Canadian, created Hawaiian Pizza (ham and pineapple toppings) in 1962 in Chatham, Ontario
  4. Canada is one of the most educated nations in the world, with over half the population earning college degrees
  5. Wasaga Beach in Ontario is longest fresh water beach in the world
  6. Canada has more fresh water lakes than all the world’s lakes combined
  7. License plates from the Northwest Territories are in the shape of a polar bear
  8. Toronto, Ontario’s Yonge Street is the longest street in the world, 1896 kms

Official 2019 Top Choice Award Nominee

Active Professionals is proud to announce that we are an Official 2019 Top Choice Award Nominee!

Top Choice Awards

Thank you to all of those who have taken the time to nominate us! Now, we need your help to WIN! Voting is now open and if you feel that we have earned your vote, we would appreciate you taking the time to vote for us. Winning the Top Choice Award is one of the largest endorsements a business can receive within North America & Europe, so this is a BIG deal!

Show us some love by voting for us. Your vote will automatically enter you into a draw for a chance to win a grand cash prize of $2000 or one of many Toppy T-shirts.
You can vote for us here: https://www.topchoiceawards.com/vote?query=Active%20Professionals. Otherwise, you can contact Top Choice Awards via email or phone to vote for us.

Voting ends January 2nd, 2019.

We would love to win the Top Choice Award… But we need your help to do so. If you believe we are your Top Choice, why not help us spread the word! 

Thank you for your time and we appreciate your vote!

P.S your written feedback in the survey is anonymous but very important to us, as it allows us to know what you love about us and what we can improve to continue serving you every day and providing the best customer experience possible. Many thanks in advance!

Top Five Reasons to Live in New Brunswick

Choosing where to live is a big decision that can be a bit nerve-racking. To help make your decision easier, here is a list of five reasons you may want to choose New Brunswick as your new home.

Eastquoddy Lighthouse (Campobello, New Brunswick Canada)

Work Life Balance

New Brunswick is a land for people who desire a simpler, no-frills lifestyle amidst a land teeming with lakes and forests. It has a reputation for a strong work ethic, employer loyalty and a healthy work/life balance. While hard work is valued, people take the time to enjoy family and leisure activities as well.

Inexpensive Real Estate

Compared to other provinces, New Brunswick offers some of the least expensive real estate in the country. The average price of homes sold in New Brunswick was $189,118 in June 2018, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association. These low prices allow most families to afford a home and land, where in other areas this is something enjoyed only by the wealthy.

Hopewell Rocks in Canada at sunrise

The Breathtaking Landscapes

There is no denying the beauty of Atlantic Canada with stunning fjords, sweeping tides and defiant lighthouses staring down the ocean from the rocky shore. There are a number of culturally and historically significant landmarks to enjoy too.

Top Tier Education

New Brunswick offers your children access to some of the finest education in the country, with all citizens and permanent residents enjoying government-funded education until the age of 20. The province also boasts the highest high school graduation rate in the country.

Bilingual Province

New Brunswick is the only Canadian province that has both French and English as its official language, by law. Research has now shown that bilingual young adults not only fare better in the job market, but are also more likely to demonstrate empathy and problem-solving skills. Imagine the possibilities that might come with being fluent in three languages.

If a low-key, relaxing, outdoor lifestyle is of interest to you, then you should consider New Brunswick. Contact our team today at info@activeprofessionals.com to learn more about the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program and determine your next steps.

Top Considerations When Looking for Your First Home

You’re in the process of making Canada your new home and now it is time to look for a place of your own. Before you begin shopping for a house, it’s important to know how much you can afford. At this stage, you should also consider whether you would like to rent or buy.

Once you know what you can spend, you will want to determine what you are looking for in a home now as well as what you might want in the future. Some considerations include:

  • Size Requirements, Housing Type and Special Features: How many bedrooms/bathrooms would you like? Would you like to have a yard or a Garage? Do you want air conditioning, storage, or a fireplace? Do you have family members with special needs?
  • Setting, Lifestyles and Stages: Do you want to live in a city, the suburbs or a rural environment? Do you plan to have children? Do you have teenagers who will be moving away soon? Are you close to retirement?
  • Work and Schools: Are you willing to take on a long commute every morning? Which schools are in your neighbourhood? How will your children get there?
  • Culture, Family and friends: How important is it to live close to them? Do you have a place of worship or cultural community centre nearby?

After determining your expectations and financial capabilities, it is time to consider which neighbourhood is right for you and what is available on the market. Your home’s location will play a big role in your everyday life, so it’s important to consider all of the features that come with a new neighborhood before deciding where to buy. Here is a list of some factors that may influence your decision.

  • Neighborhood safety, emergency services, hospitals and medical care
  • Preschools, elementary schools, and high schools
  • Banking and financial institutions
  • Grocery stores, parks and shopping

Finally, you may want to find yourself a real estate agent who knows the market and can help you locate your dream home.